Walking stage 2 of the IDR

Willow Street today

Stage 2 of Reading’s Inner Distribution Road (IDR) from Castle Hill to Southampton Street was under construction during 1969. After crossing Castle Hill, pedestrians can use a slipway down to Coley.

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Katesgrove School Buildings

By Wynne Frankum

Katesgrove Primary School

As my knowledge of the history of Katesgrove school grew, it became apparent that it was possibly unique; two Victorian Schools on one site built to quite different designs. This was of great interest for visitors interested in the history of education.

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Walking stage I of Reading’s IDR

The IDR as it was intended to be built at the time that Stage I was under construction.

Construction of Reading’s Inner Distribution Road (IDR) started in 1969, but it had been included in development plans since 1957 and no doubt was a twinkle in someone’s eye some time before that. It still bothers Reading’s civic soul when proposals are brought forward to make it one-way or to cover over part of it or turn it into a park.

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Lessons at the Victorian schoolroom at Katesgrove School

By Wynne Frankum

1873 school on Katesgrove Lane

Good better best,
never let it rest,
’till your good is better
and your better best.

This was the Victorian rhyme learnt by heart by pupils visiting the Katesgrove schoolroom. It became our mantra when setting up the Victorian schoolroom. Artefacts and lessons used in the schoolroom had to be thoroughly researched and, as far as the budget allowed, historically accurate.

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Introduction to “a walk around Reading’s IDR”

The IDR as it was intended to be built at the time that Stage I was under construction.

The Whitley Pump is leading a walk around Reading’s Inner Distribution Road (IDR) as part of this year’s Heritage Open Days in September. Reading’s post-war history, in which it transformed from a primarily industrial to a retail town, circle the IDR like the IDR circles the town centre.

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A Reading Bookseller, Publisher and Author (extended article)

York Lodge, 81 Baker Street, Reading

In March we published a piece by Matthew Farrall about ‘The Berkshire Book of Song, Rhyme and Steeple Chime’ by Arthur L Humphreys. Matthew noticed that the author’s address was York Lodge, Reading, and discovered the connection between Humphreys and another, albeit short term and involuntary Reading resident, Oscar Wilde.

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The fate of the Whitley Conduit

Drawing of the Whitley Conduit 1908 by Mr T.T. Cumming – Berks, Bucks & Oxon Archaeological Journal Vol 14

The Whitley Conduit on Highgrove Street was probably Reading Abbey’s drinking water source until the Abbey’s dissolution in the sixteenth century. The conduit existed at least until 1908, when Edward Margrett described the remains and requested that the municipal authorities repair it. But what happened to it after that?

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Book Review: The Lime Tree by César Aria

Town Hall (Palacio Municipal)

‘The Lime Tree’ by César Aira is a recent arrival in the World Shop at the Reading International Solidarity Centre (RISC) on London Street. The short novel is set in Coronel Pringles in Argentina, a real place named after a real person, Juan Pascual Pringles, a hero of the wars of independence against Spain in the early nineteenth century. It is also where author César Aira really grew up.

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Twinned with the Whitley Pump – Woolhampton Drinking Fountain

Woolhampton’s drinking fountain was presented to the village (which is on the A4 halfway between Reading and Newbury) by Miss Charlotte Blyth, a member of the family who owned the Woolhampton estate at the time, to mark the diamond jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897. The inscription on the wall inside says “Righteousness Exalteth a Nation. Victoria R.I. Diamond Jubilee 1897”.

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Munchees happy café

I spent a year unemployed in Reading in 85-86 and it made me feel pretty low. It is incredible how quickly your self-confidence ebbs away when you are in that situation. On Giro day I used to treat myself to a meal out at this friendly café at the Butter Market called Munchees; I would have usually have either the burger or fish-n-chips and a milky coffee. A waitress would take your order and you paid at the counter afterwards. Back then, there was a big bloke with a moustache running the place who always made you feel as you were on to a bargain by knocking 10% off the bill and you would be offered a free lollipop on leaving.

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1962 air crash wreckage found at Kennet Meadows

By Adrian Lawson.

Coley Meadows (c) Adrian Lawson

I met the owner of part of Coley meadows many years ago, and he told me a fascinating tale of two aeroplanes colliding there. He described the area where he thought they had crashed, and for many years I kept my eyes open for any sign. When the Fobney Island nature reserve was being dug I had hoped to find some evidence, but there was none. I looked it up and found a news report; the crash happened on 4 November 1962. There was no detail on the actual location, so I asked a few of the more senior residents, but strangely nobody knew much.

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