Hamlet at the Progress Theatre – ‘unmanly grief’

Hamlet (Megan Turnell). Photo (c) Aidan Moran courtesy of the Progress Theatre

This is the play where Shakespeare put language into orbit, elevating words far above their station and onto a higher shelf of consciousness and depth. Any amateur production of Hamlet is ambitious; the lead actor has 1400 lines if played in full, and you need to be thespian mob-handed to cover so many other roles and speaking parts. Even the minor roles seem to have more layers than the earth’s crust. But the Progress is a theatre with ambition, courage and  enthusiastic actors who seem to pull off most theatrical challenges with brio and aplomb. Even so, I would hate to “go on alone” for such a challenge (West end actor-speak for sober) and for the audience, a large G&T would seem mandatory.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Council starts to clean and survey ‘black history’ mural

The ‘Black History’ mural

Reading Borough Council (RBC) has contracted conservation experts Arte Conservation to start cleaning the ‘black history’ mural in Mill Lane on the side of the former Central Club. The council say that work will start this week and should last a fortnight, which will allow a detailed photographic survey and assessment of the mural’s condition.

Continue reading

Reading Borough Council involved in ‘obfuscation and deception’ says Aspire chair

Keith Kerr, Aspire CIC chair

The dispute between Reading’s Afro-Caribbean communities and Reading Borough Council (RBC) over a bid to acquire the old Central Club on London Street and its ‘black history’ mural led to a public demonstration through the town centre on 25 September. Keith Kerr, the chair of the legal entity set up to manage the bid on behalf of Reading’s Afro-Caribbeans, the Aspire Community Interest Company (CIC), talked to the Whitley Pump about what he intended for the site, how much he was willing to pay for it and how he feels the bid has been mistreated by RBC.

Continue reading