Liam Challenger, the Labour Party candidate in the Katesgrove local election

Liam Challenger Katesgrove Labour Party local election candidate 2019

Liam Challenger is standing as a Labour Party candidate in the local election on Thursday 2 May. There are four candidates in Katesgrove, and the winner will become a local councillor at Reading Borough Council. We asked each candidate the same eight questions to learn more about them.

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Natalie Greenstreet, the Conservative Party candidate in the Katesgrove local election

Natalie Greenstreet, Katesgrove Conservative Party local election candidate 2019

Natalie Greenstreet is standing as a Conservative Party candidate in the local election on Thursday 2 May. There are four candidates in Katesgrove, and the winner will become a local councillor at Reading Borough Council. We asked each candidate the same eight questions to learn more about them.

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Peter Kinsley, the Liberal Democrat candidate in the Katesgrove local election

Peter Kinsley, Katesgrove Liberal Democrat local election candidate 2019

Peter Kinsley is standing as a Liberal Democrat candidate in the local election on Thursday 2 May. There are four candidates in Katesgrove, and the winner will become a local councillor at Reading Borough Council. We asked each candidate the same eight questions to learn more about them.

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Louise Keane, the Green Party candidate in the Katesgrove local election

Louise Keane, Katesgrove Green Party local election candidate 2019. Photo: Louise Keane.

Louise Keane is standing as a Green Party candidate in the local election on Thursday 2 May. There are four candidates in Katesgrove, and the winner will become a local councillor at Reading Borough Council. We asked each candidate the same eight questions to learn more about them.

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Don’t look at this thing! Look at that thing, over there!

By Scaramouche.

Reading Borough Council treated the town to a masterclass in diversion and obfuscation at their council meeting of 26 February, only managing to clarify that councillors were not obliged to clarify anything, and that rather than asking pettyfogging questions about how they were spending their money, the public should bask in the glow of virtue signalling instead.

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Technical fault at Reading Borough Council

By Scaramouche.

Reading Borough Council’s (RBC) lead councillor for health, wellbeing and sport Graeme Hoskin unexpectedly started channelling Little Dorrit at the policy committee meeting on 29 October. It is gratifying to know that in this era of austerity RBC can still maintain the high standards of circumlocution and inaction for which all levels of English government are justly famed.

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Could St Laurence’s drinking fountain flow again?

St Laurence’s Church Fountain

Always a nice moment when conflicting agendas collide and something good comes of it for everyone. During the ‘questions from the public and councillors’ section of an edgy and rancorous Reading Borough Council (RBC) policy committee on 24 September, councillor Tony Page seemed to suggest that St Laurence’s drinking fountain could flow again.

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Reading Borough Council accounts 2016/17 expected to be qualified

An Inca quipucamayoc with quipu and yupana

The Reading Borough Council (RBC) financial year 2016/17 ended on 31 March 2017. The statutory deadline for signing off its accounts was 30 September 2017. The report going to the next RBC Audit and Governance committee on 27 September 2018 says that this sign-off is not now expected until October or early November; this is over a year late.

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That’s the way to do it!

By Scaramouche.

The abrasive relationship between Reading’s Green and Labour parties hit another of its troubled patches at Reading Borough Council‘s (RBC) traffic management sub-committee on 12 September. It devolved into the kind of public row that leads to television news stories where neighbours stare sadly at bloodstained driveways and say “they seemed such a nice couple… ”

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Sale of the Central Club

The ‘Black History’ mural

Reading Borough Council (RBC) have agreed to sell the Central Club on London Street in Katesgrove to Red Line. They will develop the site and take over responsibility for the maintenance of the mural. Councillors were at pains to point out at RBC policy committee on 16 July, that the process of finding a new use for the club since it closed in 2006 has been protracted.

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A unifying performance at Rabson’s Rec

By Kira Dixon and Daisy Richmond.

Oi! Who’s nicked the wicker man? (photo: Tommy Robinson).

As the sun set on Saturday 21 April, Whitley lit up with a unifying performance of the Spire at Rabson’s Rec. The piece saw divided sections of Whitley, each with a unique type of ‘power’, come together to build a spire. Three groups of performances represented different types of energy, such as light, sound and mechanical. The young performers each took part in bringing these ideas to life.

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Craft Theory at South Street

By Zoe Andrews.

Chaats Indian Street Food at the Craft Theory Festival, South Street

I missed out on the first Craft Theory festival at Katesgrove’s South Street Arts Centre last year, but I read the reviews with excitement and suffered a major case of FOMO [note 1]. I was in a unique position for the festival on 13 and 14 April this year; not only did I volunteer for Friday behind the jump [note 2], pouring drinks and loving it, but I also arrived bright-eyed on Saturday to spend the afternoon getting merry with my pals.

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Reading East MP Matt Rodda says violent crime is rising. But is it?

Matt Rodda, Katesgrove councillor and Reading East MP

Reading East MP Matt Rodda recently gave his opinion that violent crime was rising and that the government should end police cuts. Mr Rodda used Thames Valley Police performance figures for Reading as evidence for this. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is wary of interpreting police crime report data to show trends in violent crime, and both Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) and Thames Valley Police (TVP) have suggested that recent rises in violent crime recorded by the police may be due to improvements in police recording procedures.

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