Should there be a zebra crossing on Upper Redlands Road?

By Els De Mets.

Most parents are familiar with the challenges of dropping off and picking up their children from school. It is stressful getting there on time and finding somewhere to park or, for those of us who walk or cycle to school, finding a safe place to cross the road amidst the chaos.

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Give the IDR a break from traffic

By Reg Vastern-King, chair of the Friends of the IDR.

Reading’s Green party lit the briefest flicker of hope in the breasts of the Friends of the IDR this week that the town could convert the Inner Distribution Road (IDR) into a cycle track for a day.

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That’s the way to do it!

By Scaramouche.

The abrasive relationship between Reading’s Green and Labour parties hit another of its troubled patches at Reading Borough Council‘s (RBC) traffic management sub-committee on 12 September. It devolved into the kind of public row that leads to television news stories where neighbours stare sadly at bloodstained driveways and say “they seemed such a nice couple… ”

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Walking stage I of Reading’s IDR

The IDR as it was intended to be built at the time that Stage I was under construction.

Construction of Reading’s Inner Distribution Road (IDR) started in 1969, but it had been included in development plans since 1957 and no doubt was a twinkle in someone’s eye some time before that. It still bothers Reading’s civic soul when proposals are brought forward to make it one-way or to cover over part of it or turn it into a park.

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Introduction to “a walk around Reading’s IDR”

The IDR as it was intended to be built at the time that Stage I was under construction.

The Whitley Pump is leading a walk around Reading’s Inner Distribution Road (IDR) as part of this year’s Heritage Open Days in September. Reading’s post-war history, in which it transformed from a primarily industrial to a retail town, circle the IDR like the IDR circles the town centre.

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Happy new year from the Traffic Penalty Tribunal: the Southampton Street bus lane CCTV is useless


A PCN (penalty charge notice) robot at Reading Borough Council issued me with a £30 fine in November for driving in the bus lane at the junction of Pell Street and Southampton Street. I contested this on the grounds that I had wanted to turn left into Pell Street, it was mandatory to join the queue in the left-hand lane to do this, and that queue had already backed up into the bus lane. I claimed it was safer to follow standard – and thus predictable – driving practice at this busy and congested junction rather than cause obstruction and confusion by doing otherwise. I added that forcing drivers to choose between an unsafe or obstructive manoeuvre or a bus lane fine was both unreasonable and unwise.

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