Prologue to the Black History Mural and Central Club debate

The sequence of events on the agenda for the meeting of Reading Borough Council (RBC) on 17 October was altered to allow questions from members of the public before the presentation of the petition and eagerly awaited debate on the Black History Mural and Central Club.

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Hamlet at the Progress Theatre – ‘unmanly grief’

Hamlet (Megan Turnell). Photo (c) Aidan Moran courtesy of the Progress Theatre

This is the play where Shakespeare put language into orbit, elevating words far above their station and onto a higher shelf of consciousness and depth. Any amateur production of Hamlet is ambitious; the lead actor has 1400 lines if played in full, and you need to be thespian mob-handed to cover so many other roles and speaking parts. Even the minor roles seem to have more layers than the earth’s crust. But the Progress is a theatre with ambition, courage and  enthusiastic actors who seem to pull off most theatrical challenges with brio and aplomb. Even so, I would hate to “go on alone” for such a challenge (West end actor-speak for sober) and for the audience, a large G&T would seem mandatory.

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Council starts to clean and survey ‘black history’ mural

The ‘Black History’ mural

Reading Borough Council (RBC) has contracted conservation experts Arte Conservation to start cleaning the ‘black history’ mural in Mill Lane on the side of the former Central Club. The council say that work will start this week and should last a fortnight, which will allow a detailed photographic survey and assessment of the mural’s condition.

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The Historic Katesgrove Industries Tour

Reading, from the South Hill 1882. reproduced from Illustrated London News.

The Historic Katesgrove Industries tour was available for the first time on 8 September 2017 during the Heritage Open Days weekend. The two hour walk started at the foot of London Street outside Reading International Solidarity Centre (RISC) and, after a loop around Katesgrove, ended outside Great Expectations, next door to RISC.

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The Life and death of Reading’s King, in the Oracle on the Kennet

Courtesy of the “Reading-on-Thames Festival“, which is sadly a misstatement when clearly Reading’s whole history is based on the River Kennet, came free culture in the form Reading Between the Lines Theatre Company’s play The Life and Death of Reading’s King. For the lucky 700 ticket holders on the night of 15 September this was a history making moment.

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