Robert Fitzmaurice and the peace which passes all understanding

Robert Fitzmaurice 8 December 2016

Katesgrove artist Robert Fitzmaurice entertained visitors on Thursday 8 December at the private view of his recently opened solo show ‘The peace which passes all understanding‘.

The ground floor of the OHOS (OpenHand OpenSpace) studio on Oxford Road was entirely given over to his works which explored the theme of peace and conflict and asks the question “since humans seem to be hardwired for conflict can there ever be a peace which passes all understanding?” The artist gave a short talk on the inspiration for the works in the exhibition.

Symbolism is prevalent in the art of Robert Fitzmaurice and three large oil works on aluminium, ‘Ableman’, ‘Now your tractor is my chariot’ and ‘The Zealot’, referenced the transformation of agricultural machinery and equipment into menacing weapons.

‘Ramapaja’, an oil work on arches paper, was displayed in a particularly enchanting setting; alone in a room, against a soundtrack of theta brainwaves to induce a meditative state.

Ramapaja

Ramapaja

All the works are for sale at prices ranging from £250 to £2,395.  Payment methods and terms are negotiable.

The exhibition is part of Reading Year of Culture 2016 and is free and open from 1pm – 7pm until Friday 16 December (not Monday 12 December).

The gallery is at the Brock Keep on Oxford Road in West Reading, next to Brock Barracks which is just over 2 miles (about 3.5 km) from the Whitley Pump.

How to get there

Take bus 15, 16 or 17 from Reading town centre and alight at Brock Gardens stop.

If you’re going by car, then turn south into Brock Gardens from Oxford Road, then first left and through the steel gates into the free car park.


Links

  1. Robert Fitzmaurice
  2. The peace which passes all understanding
  3. OpenHand OpenSpace
  4. Reading Year of Culture 2016
  5. Katesgrove artist in ‘Fire and Water’ exhibition at OpenHand OpenSpace
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